Experience the national parks near Mt. Fuji

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National Parks of Mt.FUJI Area

Home > National Park Attractions > Hiking/mountain climbing course > Mt. Fuji mountain climbing course

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Mt. Fuji mountain climbing course

 

Shows page to be printed; enables you to print out the course

How to get there Travel by bus
Preparations to take before setting out Appropriate manners when climbing Mt. Fuji/Preparations to take prior to climbing

What you will enjoy on this course

(Yoshida Trail, from the Fuji Subaru Line) Entire journey: 1,200 minutes.
This is the most typical course to climb Mt. Fuji, with climbers taking the mountain climbers' bus to the fifth station on the Subaru Line and then proceeding to the Lake Kawaguchiko course, aiming at the summit.
There are four climbing routes on Mt. Fuji (Yoshida Trail, Fujinomiya Trail, Subashiri Trail, Gotemba Trail).
Of those, the Yoshida Trail is the climbing route that climbers take from the final stop on the Fuji Subaru Line.

Fujikyu Railway, Kawaguchiko Station

Kawaguchiko Station
Departs from Kawaguchiko Station on the Fujikyu Railway.

Kawaguchiko Station bus stop

As you exit Kawaguchiko Station’s ticket barrier, you will see the bus terminal immediately in front of you.
The number 6 bus stop is where you can catch the “Hiking Bus” heading to “Mt. Fuji fifth station.”
From this bus stop, take the Hiking Bus heading to “Mt. Fuji fifth station.”
Hiking Buses offer voice guidance in English and Chinese.

29.8km (approx. 50 minutes)

Mt. Fuji fifth station bus stop

This is the most commonly used starting point when climbing Mt. Fuji.

 

 

Mt. Fuji fifth station
parking area

 

Mt. Fuji fifth station parking area

This is the final stop on the Fuji Subaru Line. With its restaurants, shops and even a post office and a place to exchange foreign currencies, this entryway to the climbing trail has a more urban feel than any other entryway, and climbers will experience an uplifting feeling before they begin the ascent. In addition, here there are rental horses that can be ridden up to the seventh station. During the climbing season, tourist buses are parked here and the area is bustling with climbers. Consequently, insufficient parking is a problem during the peak season. When you ascend the mountain from this entryway, why not first visit Komitake Shrine, dedicated to Iwanaga-hime, the elder sister of Konohanasakuya-hime, to pray for safety as you climb the mountain?

Mt. Fuji as photographed from the fifth station

Entryway to Komitake Shrine

Komitake Shrine

Komitake Shrine

Sign at the fifth station of Mt. Fuji

Entryway to the climbing route at the fifth station

 

 

The Izumigataki crossroads

 

From the Mt. Fuji fifth station parking area to the 'Mt. Fuji Satefy Guidance Center' at the sixth station

Finally, setting off towards the summit of Mt. Fuji!
At Izumigataki, the first junction, the path becomes a gentle downward slope. At the Izumigataki junction, you will climb the upward slope on the right.
Information signs are indicated in yellow. The information signs indicated in yellow are the landmarks for the Yoshida Trail. If you ascend and descend the mountain in accordance with the yellow information signs, you will not get lost.
It is a good idea to climb while gradually acclimating yourself as you move through the forest on the way to the sixth station.

The Mt. Fuji Safety Guidance Center

The 'Mt. Fuji Safety Guidance Center' at the sixth station

Mt. Fuji Safety Guidance Center, Mt. Fuji police box under the administration of the Fujiyoshida Police Station: located at an altitude of approximately 2,390m. Here you can find the Mt. Fuji Safety Guidance Center and the Mt. Fuji police box under the administration of the Fujiyoshida Police Station.
These places also provide information relevant to the climb and distribute climbing maps. Maps are available in Japanese, English, Chinese, and Korean. Be sure to bring a map with you.

The climbing route near the sixth station

Horses taking a break near the sixth station

Sign for the climbing route at the sixth station

'From 'Mt. Fuji Safety Guidance Center' at the sixth station to 'Hanagoya' (mountain lodge)

Just beyond the sixth station you will find the Unkaisho Annex Anagoya rest lodge (currently closed for business; altitude 2,400m) and the path will merge with the path for descending the mountain.
You will climb the zigzag walking route on the right, following the line of the ridge. Near the sixth station you will find Northern Japanese Hemlock trees and Stellaria nipponica flowers, but gradually you will come to the edge of the forest, where the path turns rugged and rocky.
Walk along the side of the path closest to the mountain (the inner edge) to avoid triggering falling rocks.

From the sixth station to the town of Fujikawaguchiko

From the sixth station to Lake Yamanaka

 

 

'Mountain lodge 'Hanagoya' at the seventh station

 

''Hanagoya' (mountain lodge) at the seventh station

To get to the mountain lodge 'Hanagoya,' the lowest point at the seventh station (altitude 2,700m), you will follow a zigzagging gravel path. Climbers may also ride horses up as far as the seventh station. Most of the mountain lodges offer benches where climbers may take a break. For those who wish to watch the sunrise from the summit, it is recommended also in consideration of the atmospheric pressure that they spend the night at the mountain lodges farther up the mountain, then arise at roughly 2 or 3 AM to head to the summit. It is said that the staff at any of these mountain lodges are awake all night long.

A pilgrim's staff branded at the seventh station

A fence at the seventh station to mitigate rockslides

From the seventh station to the eighth station/At the seventh station, the mountain lodges named 'Hinodekan,' 'Tomoekan,' 'Kamaiwakan,' 'Fujiichikan,' 'Toriiso,' and 'Toyokan'

Rocky ground begins just before the seventh station. Climb slowly while maintaining your balance. Note that the iron chains located to the left and right sides of the rocky ground are to indicate the climbing path and not intended to be used for hoisting yourself up the path.
There are a total of seven mountain lodges located between the seventh and eighth stations. Spaced roughly 5 to 10 minutes' climb apart, they are ideally situated for taking breaks.

Mountain lodge 'Taishikan' at the eighth station

'The mountain lodge Taishikan is already located above the 3,000m line, at an altitude of 3,100. The name 'Taishikan' originates from the legend that Prince Shotoku (called "Shotoku Taishi" in Japanese) rode his horse up Mt. Fuji. To the right, the Yoshida Osawa valley stretches out before you. The area has long stretches of sand which can be run down (known as "suna-bashiri"), and thus in times past, this area was used for descending the mountain. There is now a danger of falling rocks, so climbers are not allowed to enter the sand area.
The mountain lodge Taishikan has a first-aid center where a doctor is always stationed.

A mouse spotted at the eighth station

A bird spotted at the eighth station

Mountain lodge 'Taishikan' at the eighth station

Mountain lodge 'Taishikan' at the eighth station

Mountain lodge 'Taishikan' at the eighth station

'Ryujin' at the eighth station

From the eighth station to the ninth station/At the eighth station, the mountain lodges named 'Horaikan,' 'Hakuunso,' 'Gansomuro,' 'Fujisan Hotel,' 'Tomoekan,' and 'Goraikokan'

In comparison to the steep slopes found near the seventh station, this area has zigzagging gentle slopes, making it easier to walk. You will find the mountain lodges Horaikan at 3,150m, Hakuunso at 3,200m and various others, one after another.

Fujisan-tempaigu, a Shinto shrine which enshrines Jikigyo Miroku

Mountain lodge 'Goraikokan' at the eighth station

Mukaekusushi Shrine at the ninth station

Mukaekusushi Shrine at the ninth station

Here the path becomes sandy and strewn with fractured red rocks, consuming still more of your energy as you climb. The mountain lodge Goraikokan, at the "8.5" station, is the last resting point before the summit.

Mukaekusushi Shrine at the ninth station

Mukaekusushi Shrine at the ninth station Shinto torii gate

From the ninth station to the summit

The structure seen above the stone guardian dogs is the Shinto torii gate to the actual summit. Once you climb past here, which is known as Toriiohashi, you will soon find yourself at the summit.


Sign at the ninth station


The summit immediately in front of you

The final step to climb before reaching the summit

Kusushi Shrine at the summit of Mt. Fuji

The summit's 'Sengen Taisha Okumiya' shrine

Once you pass between the stone guardian dogs and come through the Shinto torii gate, you will finally reach the summit! You will see Kusushi Shrine immediately in front of you, and behind that is a row of shops known as the “Fuji Ginza.” Passing by the shops, you will find the entryways to the descent routes for the Yoshida Trail and the Subashiri Trail, and beyond that is the ridge of Mt. Fuji known as Dainichi-dake (or, alternately, Asahi-dake). This area is the best for viewing the sunrise. Directly in front of you is the Dainai-in volcanic crater, or “ohachi.” Circling the crater is called “Ohachi-meguri.” From ancient times, the practice has been to circle the crater clockwise.
"Ohachi-meguri" (circling the crater atop Mt. Fuji) takes roughly two hours if walking slowly. It is a nice idea to take up the challenge if you have the time and stamina to do so.

Mt. Fuji meteorological observatory

The torii gateway to the Shinto shrine at the entryway to the summit

Near the Kusushi Shrine at the summit of Mt. Fuji

Descending the mountain


Sign for the descent route from the summit

From the summit to the eighth station (the 'Shita-edoya' junction)

Once you pass the mountain lodges and the public toilets you will find the descent paths for the Yoshida Trail and the Subashiri Trail. The signs for the Yoshida Trail (marked in yellow) and the Subashiri Trail (marked in red) take climbers down the same route until the mountain lodge 'Shitaedoya.'
You will descend the mountain using a zigzag route.
Be careful at the Shitaedoya junction. If you do not take a left onto the Yoshida Trail (marked in yellow), you will end up arriving at the fifth station on the Subashiri Trail and you will not be able to return to your starting point, the Fuji Subaru Line fifth station on the Yoshida Trail.
If you find information signs only in red, you have made a mistake in the descent route. Retrace your path back to the junction.
In addition, a great many people use the public toilets at the seventh station. It is recommended that you instead use the toilets at the mountain lodge 'Shitaedoya' at the eighth station.


The sign 100m before the 'Shitaedoya' junction


The 'Shita-edoya' junction

The sign at the 'Shitaedoya' junction

Public toilets at the seventh station

From 'Shitaedoya' junction at the eighth station to the public toilets at the seventh station

Continuing down the ongoing zigzagging descent route from the 'Shitaedoya' junction, you will reach the public toilets at the seventh station.
Beyond this point, there are no toilets until the Mt. Fuji Safety Guidance Center at the sixth station, so you should certainly take this opportunity to use the facilities.
The live camera view of the Lake Yamanakako area from 7th Station (external link)

A zigzag route down the mountain

Checking the yellow signs as you descend helps bring peace of mind.

Leisurely enjoy the scenery of the world below you as you descend the path.

From the public toilets at the seventh station to the Mt. Fuji Safety Guidance Center to the fifth station

You have now returned to the Mt. Fuji Safety Guidance Center. From here you will walk down through the forest and then up a slope to reach the fifth station parking area. You've almost reached the goal!


On the descent route, there are also tunnels for avoiding falling rocks.


You will gradually begin to see trees.

The Mt. Fuji Safety Guidance Center has come into view.

Fifth station parking area

Fifth station parking area

You have now returned to your starting point, the fifth station parking area.
Enjoy a meal or other refreshment at the shops and relax leisurely.
Well done! We eagerly await the next time you take on climbing Mt. Fuji!

The moment the goal was reached

You can share your joy with all the others who have descended Mt. Fuji.

Through taking commemorative pictures, you can enjoy the delight of having climbed the mountain without incident.

富士山登山マップ

The climbing courses within the courses introduced here are shown on a map.

Paths for climbing Mt. Fuji

This is a 10-hour course in total.

Bus route from Kawaguchiko Station

This introduces the bus route to take from Kawaguchiko Station. It also indicates the bus situation at present.